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  #11  
Old 01-30-2018, 08:31
Shaner1266 Shaner1266 is offline
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Default Re: 2018 Wildland Firefighter Academy

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Originally Posted by CoastalRSQ View Post
CalFire's cert comes from completing their Basic FF Academy. It involves some structural, in addition to a predominance of WL skills and knowledge. There are evolutions during the week including vehicle fires and complex interior attack. Practical testing for their cert involves throwing BAs and their 20ft ladder. A lot of their academy is geared toward learning about their organization and it's definitely a recruitment ground for them. Whether you do or don't want to work for them, it's an excellent training experience with superb instruction and costs very little.

The Golden State program looks excellent in many ways. The 14-day duration mirrors being on WL incidents more than the 5-day CalFire program. You also get S211 Pumps and S212 Chainsaw certs. Those are helpful for landing WL gigs and this training seems more slanted to Federal jobs. Lots of value for the cost of this program when you consider all the certs and the two full weeks of training.
CoastalRSQ-

You seem to be my go-to lately! Anyways i dropped my Firefighter I academy after a long talk with state fire training regarding reciprocity. Ive signed up for wildland-confined space- and firefighter survival through santa rosa jr college.

Im almost certain CALFIRE teaches the wildland portion at srjc, anyways any tips you have for me to prepare for this to sharpen some skills since it has been a few years since I worked as a firefighter on the East Coast. Is there a breakdown of what is taught/tested somewhere I can review beforehand to get prepared?

Thanks
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  #12  
Old 01-30-2018, 11:16
EB1980 EB1980 is offline
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Default Re: 2018 Wildland Firefighter Academy

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Originally Posted by Shaner1266 View Post
CoastalRSQ-

You seem to be my go-to lately! Anyways i dropped my Firefighter I academy after a long talk with state fire training regarding reciprocity. Ive signed up for wildland-confined space- and firefighter survival through santa rosa jr college.

Im almost certain CALFIRE teaches the wildland portion at srjc, anyways any tips you have for me to prepare for this to sharpen some skills since it has been a few years since I worked as a firefighter on the East Coast. Is there a breakdown of what is taught/tested somewhere I can review beforehand to get prepared?

Thanks
do you have an FF1 academy from out of state?
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  #13  
Old 01-30-2018, 17:31
Shaner1266 Shaner1266 is offline
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Default Re: 2018 Wildland Firefighter Academy

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Originally Posted by EB1980 View Post
do you have an FF1 academy from out of state?
Yes I do.
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  #14  
Old 01-30-2018, 18:01
CoastalRSQ CoastalRSQ is offline
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Default Re: 2018 Wildland Firefighter Academy

EB - He’s mentioned previously that he’s got FFI/II IFSAC/PB from Nevada if I recall correctly. He’s also completed an academy in his former state.

Shaner - I’m sure you made the best decision given all facts involved. Cal Fire does run the WL camp at SRJC. It is superb. What you can expect is a fast-moving 5 days filled with excellent instruction and knowledge. Cal Fire used to have the 67-hour Basic FFI cert, but per the instructors at this specific camp, what you’ll get is a lot more like their 179-hour program regarding content and skills covered.

You’ll come out with S-130, S-131, L-180, and S-190. That puts you at Type I WL per NWCG standards. You may know this, but NWCG/IQCS goes inverse to structural certs (i.e. Type II WL is entry and Type I is advanced). You’ll also be given a Cal Fire cert for WL FF Safety & Survival based on the coursework covered. If you pass both the written and skills tests given by Cal Fire on Day 5, you’ll receive your Basic Fire Fighter Academy cert from them.

The CF skills are 8 in total I believe, while SFT is 5. The 5 common ones are proctored simultaneously. The difference is that you’ll throw CF’s 20-foot, 3-way ladder in one test and a couple other tests that have a structural element to it. CF’s BFFA cert is their version of FFI and affords you an edge in pursuit of jobs with them if you have that interest. If you were to fail a single CF skill twice or their written, you won’t get their BFFA cert and would have to retake the entire course and pass to get it.

As long as you pass the 5 SFT skills, you’ll have completed the necessary practical component of WL for your reciprocity process. You’ll likely take the written portion of the SFT WL curriculum later in the spring when SRJC’s academy takes their SFT written tests for structural, WL, & HazMat. Wouldn’t hurt to ask the SRJC directors if you can take that sooner, though.

As for ConSpace Awareness and FF Safety & Survival (SFT), did the program directors confirm those are being offered there this spring? If not, you can knock those out elsewhere at several locations. The first is an 8-hour course and the other is 16 over two days. Be aware that the FF Safety & Survival course of the same name is also an offering in the Fire Technology curriculum. While covering much of the same info, it is a college course instead of the SFT course and does not satisfy your needed SFT requirement for reciprocity.

You’re essentially taking this course with their spring academy group and will assimilate as part of that group throughout the week as those cadets cover their WL curriculum and testing. If it’s a group with good team chemistry and maturity, they’ll be a pleasure to train with. If not, do your best to enhance their (and your) experience by displaying selfless, positive leadership. The instructors will see that and appreciate it greatly.

The instructors in the program will be many of CF’s finest captains and engineers, mainly from the LNU unit. Expect them to be down to earth, light-hearted, yet all business when it comes to getting it done. These were some of the first and foremost responders at the North Bay fire complexes (Tubbs and Atlas) last fall. Learn as much as you can from them and ask many questions.

Other components of the week...you’ll be on the SRJC campus nonstop for the first 60 hours of the camp. They’ll probably take your phones on the first day and that’s a good thing. Prepare your outside commitments to not have responsiveness to anyone and anything external during that time. You’ll be hammering through tons of class material and be sure to appreciate the quality of content and instruction rather than mentally check out while viewing it as “death by PowerPoint”. It’s not. It’s teaching you how to survive and thrive on the WL ground.

Expect 1-3 hours of sleep at most the first two nights since the cadre will wake you up multiple times each night for evolutions including complex interior attack with rescues, vehicle fires, and team challenges based on communication skills. Be the voice of positivity and tough love to keep the group strong as eyes and spirits grow weary from the WL incident simulation of next to no sleep. Go in with the mindset that we are only as good as our worst day and performance and you’ll be an inspiration to the group.

Expect to cut line on many different grades and surfaces on the hike. The hike is much more of an off-road running race than your traditional “45-minute, 3-mile pack test” which will serve as your red card requirement if you choose to officialize your Type I WL status through IQCS. I suggest doing so as you’ll have earned it and building documented WL creds can help your career versatility. Oh yeah, if your WL boots are newer, it’s highly suggested to go for a few jogs in them prior to camp or else your feet will tell you they’re not willing to bear your body weight as camp goes on. Break em in and do it by running in them.

You may be the only add-on from outside the academy or one of a handful in the same boat as you with reciprocity. Either way, embrace it, learn all you can, make the men around you better, and be grateful you’re getting all this for next to free since it’s through the JC.
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  #15  
Old 01-30-2018, 20:28
Shaner1266 Shaner1266 is offline
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Join Date: Aug 2017
Location: East Bay
Posts: 176
Default Re: 2018 Wildland Firefighter Academy

Quote:
Originally Posted by CoastalRSQ View Post
EB - He’s mentioned previously that he’s got FFI/II IFSAC/PB from Nevada if I recall correctly. He’s also completed an academy in his former state.

Shaner - I’m sure you made the best decision given all facts involved. Cal Fire does run the WL camp at SRJC. It is superb. What you can expect is a fast-moving 5 days filled with excellent instruction and knowledge. Cal Fire used to have the 67-hour Basic FFI cert, but per the instructors at this specific camp, what you’ll get is a lot more like their 179-hour program regarding content and skills covered.

You’ll come out with S-130, S-131, L-180, and S-190. That puts you at Type I WL per NWCG standards. You may know this, but NWCG/IQCS goes inverse to structural certs (i.e. Type II WL is entry and Type I is advanced). You’ll also be given a Cal Fire cert for WL FF Safety & Survival based on the coursework covered. If you pass both the written and skills tests given by Cal Fire on Day 5, you’ll receive your Basic Fire Fighter Academy cert from them.

The CF skills are 8 in total I believe, while SFT is 5. The 5 common ones are proctored simultaneously. The difference is that you’ll throw CF’s 20-foot, 3-way ladder in one test and a couple other tests that have a structural element to it. CF’s BFFA cert is their version of FFI and affords you an edge in pursuit of jobs with them if you have that interest. If you were to fail a single CF skill twice or their written, you won’t get their BFFA cert and would have to retake the entire course and pass to get it.

As long as you pass the 5 SFT skills, you’ll have completed the necessary practical component of WL for your reciprocity process. You’ll likely take the written portion of the SFT WL curriculum later in the spring when SRJC’s academy takes their SFT written tests for structural, WL, & HazMat. Wouldn’t hurt to ask the SRJC directors if you can take that sooner, though.

As for ConSpace Awareness and FF Safety & Survival (SFT), did the program directors confirm those are being offered there this spring? If not, you can knock those out elsewhere at several locations. The first is an 8-hour course and the other is 16 over two days. Be aware that the FF Safety & Survival course of the same name is also an offering in the Fire Technology curriculum. While covering much of the same info, it is a college course instead of the SFT course and does not satisfy your needed SFT requirement for reciprocity.

You’re essentially taking this course with their spring academy group and will assimilate as part of that group throughout the week as those cadets cover their WL curriculum and testing. If it’s a group with good team chemistry and maturity, they’ll be a pleasure to train with. If not, do your best to enhance their (and your) experience by displaying selfless, positive leadership. The instructors will see that and appreciate it greatly.

The instructors in the program will be many of CF’s finest captains and engineers, mainly from the LNU unit. Expect them to be down to earth, light-hearted, yet all business when it comes to getting it done. These were some of the first and foremost responders at the North Bay fire complexes (Tubbs and Atlas) last fall. Learn as much as you can from them and ask many questions.

Other components of the week...you’ll be on the SRJC campus nonstop for the first 60 hours of the camp. They’ll probably take your phones on the first day and that’s a good thing. Prepare your outside commitments to not have responsiveness to anyone and anything external during that time. You’ll be hammering through tons of class material and be sure to appreciate the quality of content and instruction rather than mentally check out while viewing it as “death by PowerPoint”. It’s not. It’s teaching you how to survive and thrive on the WL ground.

Expect 1-3 hours of sleep at most the first two nights since the cadre will wake you up multiple times each night for evolutions including complex interior attack with rescues, vehicle fires, and team challenges based on communication skills. Be the voice of positivity and tough love to keep the group strong as eyes and spirits grow weary from the WL incident simulation of next to no sleep. Go in with the mindset that we are only as good as our worst day and performance and you’ll be an inspiration to the group.

Expect to cut line on many different grades and surfaces on the hike. The hike is much more of an off-road running race than your traditional “45-minute, 3-mile pack test” which will serve as your red card requirement if you choose to officialize your Type I WL status through IQCS. I suggest doing so as you’ll have earned it and building documented WL creds can help your career versatility. Oh yeah, if your WL boots are newer, it’s highly suggested to go for a few jogs in them prior to camp or else your feet will tell you they’re not willing to bear your body weight as camp goes on. Break em in and do it by running in them.

You may be the only add-on from outside the academy or one of a handful in the same boat as you with reciprocity. Either way, embrace it, learn all you can, make the men around you better, and be grateful you’re getting all this for next to free since it’s through the JC.
Thanks for all the information! Very helpful! And right in line with what I’ve been hearing about srjc.

Yes I have my FFI/II certificates along with a few others, from the state of Virginia.

And I do have confirmation from SRJC regarding the confined space awareness and firefighter safety and survival(16hr) occuring in April, after I do the Wildland portion(March). SRJC was recommended by Brandon Erickson at SFT because of their understanding of Reciprocity. Santa Rosa Jr College actually has an entire webpage outlining the steps for out of state Firefighters seeking reciprocity, which for somebody who has been hitting a brick wall for a few years, getting blank stares and “we only accept this/that” regarding reciprocity, was a HUGE relief! They are very well informed of what an out of state FF needs.

As for the BFFA cert, is this offered or considered as stand alone course? Or is it always part of an academy? The conclusion I’m trying to reach is whether or not ill be at a disadvantage. I.e: the cadets in the academy (I assume) know the hoseloads, if theres crosslays vs rear pulled attack lines, which attack line is going to be the “go-to” for “this/that” they probably have their “academy” way of doing/saying things down in a(n) testing/training ground format.

Not only was my academy years back, I also had 4 years experience out of academy on top of that..did I check overhead before throwing a ladder on the fireground, yes.. did I yell it out for my Captain to hear and mark that box off, no. We had regluar 24’ ext. ladders on the engine I’ve never seen that 2fly 20’ ladder until today on youtube. We also had minuteman loads off the rear...maybe im overthinking this haha.

I just want to be as prepared as possible, if theres things I can do to help myself shorten the learning curve I want to do them.
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